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Archive for the ‘Oracle10g’ Category

RemoteOperationException:ERROR:Wrong Password for User

March 12, 2011 Leave a comment

Problem in Oracle 10g database on Windows 2000/2003 Professional/Enterprise error message  “RemoteOperationException:ERROR:Wrong Password for User

Solutions

1. go to Control Panel -> Administrative Tools.

2. Click on Local Security Policy.

3. Local Policies, User Rights Assignment.

4. Double click, ‘Log on as a batch job‘.

5. Add your local user that you are supplying for the Host Credentials.

 

 

Listener Commands

March 1, 2011 Leave a comment
current_listener  
Syntax : set current_listener <listener_name>
LSNRCTL> set current_listener LISTENER
LSNRCTL> show current_listener
displaymode 
Syntax : set displaymode <RAW | COMPAT | NORMAL | VEBOSE>
LSNRCTL> show displaymode
Service display mode is NORMAL
LSNRCTL> set displaymode VERBOSE
inbound_connect_timeout 
Syntax : set inbound_connect_timeout <value>
LSNRCTL> set inound_connect_timeout 0
log_directory     
Syntax : set log_directory <directory_path>
LSNRCTL> set log_directory c:\listner_log
log_file    
Syntax : set log_file <file_name>
LSNRCTL> set log_file listner.log
log_status  
Syntax : set log_status < ON | OFF>
LSNRCTL> set log_status ON
password    
Syntax : set password
LSNRCTL> set password
Password:
rawmode     
Syntax : set rawmode <ON | OFF>
LSNRCTL> set rawmode OFF
save_config_on_stop     
Syntax : set save_config_on_stop <ON | OFF>
LSNRCTL> set save_config_on_stop ON
startup_waittime  
Syntax : set startup_waittime <value>
LSNRCTL> set startup_waittime 0
trc_directory     
Syntax : set trc_directory <directory path>
LSNRCTL> set trc_directory c:\listner_log
trc_file    
Syntax : set trc_level <file_name>
LSNRCTL> set trc_file listener.trc
trc_file    
Syntax : set trc_level <file_name>
LSNRCTL> set trc_file listener.trc
trc_level set trc_level <value>
Value

Description

0 – 1

off

2 – 3

err

4 – 5

user

6 – 14

admin

15

dev

16 – 99

support

LSNRCTL> set trc_level 0

Services view the current listener services

lsnrctl services
Start the listener  lsnrctl start
Stop the listener  lsnrctl stop
Show status lsnrctl status
Listener version lsnrctl version

RESTRICTED SESSION

February 24, 2011 Leave a comment
SQL> select logins from v$instance;
LOGINS
----------
ALLOWED

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM ENABLE RESTRICTED SESSION;
System altered.

SQL> select logins from v$instance;
LOGINS
----------
RESTRICTED

$ sqlplus <username>/<password>@<serviceid>
SQL*Plus: Release 10.2.0.1.0 - Production on Thu Feb 24 09:26:48 2011
Copyright (c) 1982, 2005, Oracle.  All rights reserved.
ERROR:
ORA-01035: ORACLE only available to users with RESTRICTED SESSION privilege

SQL> ALTER SYSTEM DISABLE RESTRICTED SESSION;
System altered.

alter system enable restricted session‘ does not “kick out” user automatically. It just blocks new user who does not have the ‘restrict session’ privilege to login, similar to ‘ALTER SYSTEM QUIESCE RESTRICTED’, which blocks new non-dba users. However, I can scarely see the instances when non-dba users have been granted to the ‘restrict session’ privilege.

ALTER SYSTEM QUIESCE RESTRICTED;

Non-DBA active sessions will continue until they become inactive. An active session is one that is currently inside of a transaction, a query, a fetch, or a PL/SQL statement; or a session that is currently holding any shared resources (for example, enqueues). No inactive sessions are allowed to become active. For example, If a user issues a SQL query in an attempt to force an inactive session to become active, the query will appear to be hung. When the database is later unquiesced, the session is resumed, and the blocked action is processed.

The following statement restores the database to normal operation:

ALTER SYSTEM UNQUIESCE;

All non-DBA activity is allowed to proceed. In an Oracle Real Application Clusters environment, this statement is not required to be issued from the same session, or even the same instance, as that which quiesced the database. If the session issuing the ALTER SYSTEM UNQUIESCE statement terminates abnormally, then the Oracle Database server ensures that the unquiesce operation completes.

The ACTIVE_STATE column of the V$INSTANCE view to see the current state of an instance. The column values has one of these values:

  • NORMAL: Normal unquiesced state.
  • QUIESCING: Being quiesced, but some non-DBA sessions are still active.
  • QUIESCED: Quiesced; no non-DBA sessions are active or allowed.

Monitoring SGA (Free Memory) Using v$sgastat

February 7, 2011 Leave a comment

In this article, we will discuss how to get monitor free memory in System Global Area (SGA) in Oracle 10g. The System Global Area (SGA) Memory Structures in data. The SGA is read/write.  A system global area is a group of shared memory areas that dedicated to an Oracle database instance. For example Large Pool, Shared Pool, Java Pool etc.

SQL> SHOW SGA;
Total System Global Area  608174080 bytes
Fixed Size                  2006160 bytes
Variable Size             176161648 bytes
Database Buffers          423624704 bytes
Redo Buffers                6381568 bytes

Let’s use v$sgastat parameter in this article. The v$sgastat parameter displays detailed information on the system global area (SGA).

SQL> DESC v$sgastat;
Name                                      Null?    Type
----------------------------------------- -------- ----------------
POOL                                               VARCHAR2(12)
NAME                                               VARCHAR2(26)
BYTES                                              NUMBER

Let’s have a short explanation of all column of the v$sgastat parameter:

POOL: Designates the pool in which the memory in NAME resides:

  • Shared Pool: Memory is allocated from the shared pool.
  • Large Pool: Memory is allocated from the large pool.
  • Java Pool: Memory is allocated from the Java pool.
  • Streams Pool: Memory is allocated from the Streams pool.

NAME: The name column means system global area component name.

BYTES: The memory size in bytes.

Now we will use a simple SQL to see the free memory in SGA.

SQL> Select POOL, Round(bytes/1024/1024,0) Free_Memory_In_MB
  2  From V$sgastat
  3  Where Name Like '%free memory%';
POOL         FREE_MEMORY_IN_MB
------------ -----------------
shared pool                 22
large pool                   3
java pool                    4
streams pool                 8

Step by Step Oracle Enterprise Manager Configuration

February 7, 2011 Leave a comment

In this article, we will discuss monitoring configuration in Oracle Enterprise Manager.

Go to http://<hostname&gt;:<port-number>/em then specifying the system username and password after that we will click Login button.

N.B: Make sure enterprise manager console is running. to check it, issue following command.

$ emctl status dbconsole

The home page is displaying. After that we will click Monitoring Configuration under the Related Links.

The Configure Database Instance: Properties page is displaying. We will enter the correct password in the Monitor Password field and click Test Connection.

The Database Instance Configuration Result page is displaying. After some time next page is displaying.

The Configure Database Instance: Review page is displaying. We will click Submit button.

The Database Instance Configuration Result page is displaying. We will click OK button, after that we will go to Home page of the Oracle Database.


 

2010 in review

January 2, 2011 Leave a comment

The stats helper monkeys at WordPress.com mulled over how this blog did in 2010, and here’s a high level summary of its overall blog health:

Healthy blog!

The Blog-Health-o-Meter™ reads Fresher than ever.

Crunchy numbers

Featured image

The average container ship can carry about 4,500 containers. This blog was viewed about 17,000 times in 2010. If each view were a shipping container, your blog would have filled about 4 fully loaded ships.

 

In 2010, there were 32 new posts, growing the total archive of this blog to 67 posts. There were 12 pictures uploaded, taking up a total of 3mb. That’s about a picture per month.

The busiest day of the year was October 13th with 164 views. The most popular post that day was Use oradim in Linux.

Where did they come from?

The top referring sites in 2010 were google.co.in, en.wordpress.com, google.com, facebook.com, and yandex.ru.

Some visitors came searching, mostly for pl/sql lock timer, oracle parameterized view, oradim linux, oracle 11g oradim unix, and db_writer_processes.

Attractions in 2010

These are the posts and pages that got the most views in 2010.

1

Use oradim in Linux November 2009

2

Oracle 10g Enterprise Manager January 2010

3

Parameterized View in Oracle April 2010
1 comment

4

ER Diagram of HR System November 2009

5

Partition Table In Oracle January 2010

Categories: Oracle10g

Oracle & Iron Man – Great Combination

August 31, 2010 Leave a comment
Categories: Oracle10g Tags: